Health A-Z: Breast Cancer

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Breast cancer is considered invasive when the cancer cells have penetrated the lining of the ducts or lobules. That means the cancer cells can be found in the surrounding tissues, such as fatty and connective tissues or the skin. Noninvasive breast cancer (in situ) occurs when cancer cells fill the ducts but haven't spread into surrounding tissue.

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What Is It?A biopsy is a tissue sample removed from the body and examined under a microscope. In a breast biopsy, a doctor removes tissue from a suspicious area so that a pathologist can determine whether the tissue contains… Read More

Wire Localization Biopsy of the Breast - Health A-Z

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    The Patient Education Center provides multimedia access to reliable and relevant medical information at and beyond the point of care. Our content is developed exclusively by Harvard Health Publications, the media and publishing division of the Harvard Medical School of Harvard University, and distributed by Health Media Network.